Troubleshooting Electric Garage Doors: Common Problems You Might Experience

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Are you having problems with your electric garage door? Perhaps it is getting stuck when you try to open or close it, the button on your door opener is no longer working, or it is failing to open altogether. There are a few different things that might be wrong with the door. Here are helpful tips for troubleshooting the problems so that you can get the right repairs done. The Photo Eye Isn’t Working Most modern electric garage doors have what is called a photo eye. This detects if a person is in front of the garage door or blocking it, and might get hit by the door if it opens or closes. This is typically a few inches off the ground and is very small. It works by shooting a laser along the length of the garage, so that if it is interrupted, it knows something must be in the way. If an object or person was in front of the door, but it kept opening without interruption, there is probably something wrong with the photo eye. Check to make sure it is not clogged with dirt or dust, then consult a garage repairman if it is still not working. Lack of Power Believe it or not, a lot of problems with an electric garage door is simply from accidentally cutting off the power supply. This can happen very easily and you don’t realize it until you check the power source and realize it was turned off. Double-check it be sure it is plugged in, and that there are not frayed or bent wires that might affect the power going to the door. Also make sure the outlet it is plugged into is working. Broken Torsion Springs Another problem you might be having with your garage door is that the torsion springs are broken. If you hear a snap or other odd noise, the torsion springs on the door probably broke or are in the midst of breaking. It is often very loud and sounds like a gunshot. If the spring breaks, do not try to open the door, as it could be dangerous and cause injury. If you hear this noise, call someone equipped to handle garage door repairs. The Remote isn’t Working If the remote control to your electric garage door is not working, it could be due to a few things. First of all, make sure you are within range when clicking it. Try going forward or backward to see if that makes a difference. You can also try checking the antenna on the motor of the door for any damage or blockage. Additionally, try changing the battery on the remote or reprogramming...

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How Routine HVAC Maintenance Can Benefit You: 5 Ways

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Routine maintenance of your heating and cooling systems can add up to be well worth your while. The impact that routine maintenance will have on your bottom line will be far more than the money you will spend on the service maintenance itself. Maintenance of your systems will give you plenty of benefits. See below for those benefits. Energy Savings Energy savings is the number one benefit you will receive from maintaining your system. Your HVAC system accounts for nearly half of your entire energy bill for your home. The energy efficiency of your home’s comfort system is the largest chunk of the energy dollars. Giving your system some TLC in the form of cleanings, lubricating, adjustments and minor parts replacement, will make your system will run smoother, longer and more efficiently. Repair Savings  Routine maintenance will help to prevent larger, more costly problems later down the road. You will be able to catch smaller, less costly issues, before they grow into more inconvenient problems. Lifetime Of Equipment Savings Taking care of your home comfort system will help keep your equipment running year after year. The cost to replace your HVAC systems can be pretty hefty, so take care of what you have and you can put off investing in a new system. Your equipment parts themselves will also last longer because they will have been well taken care of. Less Inconvenience, Continuing Comfort Routine maintenance is planned ahead of time with your professional HVAC company. You can plan for your maintenance service at a time that is convenient for you, without any interruption of your home’s comfort. Without regular maintenance, you could be left without your home’s comfort system due to an unexpected breakdown, at a time that is probably going to be an inconvenience for you and your family. Safety Checks A preseason tune-up of your heating system can get you a safety check for carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and tasteless gas, that can cause serious injury or death to someone unknowingly breathing it in. Problems with your furnace can be the cause of a carbon monoxide leak in your home. Having your system maintained, a problem such as this can be found before it causes injury to someone in your home. This reason alone is a good reason to have your HVAC systems regularly checked and maintained. Contact your local heating and air conditioning company to schedule your routine maintenance checkup, through companies such as Comfort Advisors Heating & Air Conditioning, for your systems. It is beneficial, not just for your pocketbook, but also for the safety of your...

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Comparing Hydronic & Electric Radiant Floor Heating Systems

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

If your feet are cold, you’re cold. The ancient Romans knew this, and circulated heated air under the floors in their homes. As early as the 1930s, famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright used hot water to heat the floors in some of his buildings. Today, radiant floor heating systems are better than ever at keeping your feet toasty warm throughout the chilly parts of the year without having to turn up the heat in the rest of the house. If you purchase a radiant floor heater, you have a choice between three types: electric, liquid (hydronic), and heated air systems. Heated air is rarely used, as the US Department of Energy explains. Choose, instead, between electric and hydronic systems, both of which have distinct characteristics. Electric Radiant Floor Heaters If you like the convenience of using a thermostat to control your floor heat and you’re installing the radiant system in an existing structure, an electric radiant floor system is the one for you. An electric system typically runs a series of cables, coils or wires underneath the subfloor or finished floor (known as a “dry” installation method) and occasionally, in a bed of concrete (a “wet” method). Since there’s no moving parts and the system is unlikely to be disturbed, electric radiant floor heating systems are considered low maintenance. Yet, a qualified professional can repair the system fairly easily using an underground fault detector. Consult a professional such as Thompson Heating & Air Conditioning Inc for installation information; most systems are not DIY-friendly. Hydronic Radiant Floor Heaters Hydronic radiant floor systems use water, forced through pipes underneath the floor, to heat the floor surface. The temperature of the water itself dictates the temperature of the floor. Since another heat system is responsible for heating the water, a hydronic system is more complex than an electric system. Considering the cost of the heat system, the  cost of the hydronic system, and the fact that a professional must install the floor heater, it’s likely to cost much more than an electric system. With all the parts—plus the fact that water, including sediment in the water, is involved—a hydronic system will probably experience problems before an electric system. Also, it’s a wet installation, meaning a bed of concrete must be installed. On the other hand, the hydronic system is more efficient than electric floor heaters when combined with thermostats and zoning valves that regulate the flow of water....

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Simple Upgrades To Make A Basement Laundry Room More Welcoming

Posted by on Nov 12, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Basement laundry rooms often end up as forgotten corners because they aren’t enjoyable to look at. A few simple upgrades can change that, and you won’t have to spend a fortune to make it a more attractive work space in your home. Tackle the Walls Whether you have bare concrete, unfinished wood framing, or drywall, the best answer for a re-do remains the same—paint them. For wood and drywall, a latex interior paint provides even coverage, while concrete will require a concrete paint or stain. Choose a light color to make the room look larger and brighter, especially if there is no window in the laundry room area of your basement. A gloss or semi-gloss finish also helps reflect light, and you can easily wipe it clean if it becomes soiled. Fix Up the Floors Most basement laundry rooms have plain concrete floors, often with a drain in the center. Since basements are sometimes prone to flooding, and even washing machines can overflow, you will want to stick with hard flooring. Tile is an excellent option because it’s waterproof, you can install it directly over the concrete, and you can work it around any drains. Here’s a few considerations when tiling in the basement: If the basement floor has ever been painted, you will need to scrape off any loose paint. You will also need to vacuum up all dust and debris. Because of moisture migration through cement, tiles can crack. Using a self-leveling adhesive or a decoupling product at installation can stop this from happening. Don’t tile over the drain. Also, avoid getting grout or adhesive in the drain pipes. If the concrete has cracks, you may need to repair these before tiling. Talk to companies like Carpet Depot about your tile flooring options. Add Storage and Racks All laundry rooms can benefit from extra storage. If the studs are exposed in your basement, you almost have built-in storage. Simply install shelves or clothing bars between the studs. Make sure there is at least one shelf near the machines for detergent. For small laundry rooms, consider adding a fold down shelf or drying rack on the wall. This way, you can tuck it out of the way when it’s not in use. Hide the Ugly Exposed water heaters, pipes and utility sinks can make the laundry room unattractive even after some improvements. If you can’t get rid of it, cover it. A simple curtain can close off any eye sores so the rest of the room look bright and welcoming. Hang some artwork to distract from the curtained area, and your laundry room is ready to go. It may not be realistic to get a showroom quality laundry...

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